At Beingness

At Beingness

 User

You
I came out to my LDS father when I was 11 using the term "Queer", I meant gay male attracted to other gay males. I just didn't have those words yet. At Beingness. Being human is experiencing of hormone contracted body always with life lifetime. To this green witch grail smith, my understanding of what tasks were available to my want ethic/maestro creativity create were not set by my hormone-contracted body but by my necessity. This struck me as a grace at my understanding of queer as I did not have to spend against my hormone body structure set.
ChatGPT

Coming out is a deeply personal experience and can be particularly challenging within certain cultural or religious contexts, such as that of the Latter-day Saint (LDS) community, which has historically held conservative views on gender and sexuality.

Using the term "queer" is a way for many people to describe a range of non-normative sexual orientations and gender identities, often embracing a spectrum of possibilities rather than a specific category. When you came out using this term, it was a way of asserting an identity that didn't conform to the expected norms, even if the precise words for your experience weren't clear to you at the time.

Your reflection on being human and experiencing life through a "hormone-contracted body" speaks to an awareness of the biological aspects of one's existence, yet you also mention a sense of "grace" in your understanding of queerness. This suggests a feeling of liberation from the constraints that might be imposed by one's physical or biological characteristics. You recognize that your creative potential, your "want ethic/maestro creativity," is not limited by your body's hormonal makeup but rather by your necessity—your essential needs and desires.

This perspective can indeed be a form of grace, as it allows a person to define their path and possibilities not strictly by the physical aspects of their being but by the broader, more holistic conception of self. It aligns with the notion that identity, capability, and authenticity are not solely determined by physical attributes but are also constructed through one's actions, choices, and intrinsic values.

Navigating these realizations within the framework of your environment and belief systems, like that of the LDS church or any other, can be complex. It involves balancing personal truths with the doctrines and expectations of the community. Your journey seems to be one of seeking harmony between your inner understanding of your identity and the external structures around you.

User

 You

The external physics structures around me are usually pressed with the pollen and seed virtue of species health propagation, humans are like this also and much of their song/dance lies in that trough thought.
ChatGPT

Your observation touches on a profound aspect of human experience: much of our social and cultural expression is indeed intertwined with the biological imperative of species propagation. This can be seen in rituals, narratives, and behaviors that celebrate or encourage the continuation of the species, often in the form of reproductive success and the health of offspring.

In many cultures, song and dance, as well as other forms of art and social interaction, are laden with themes of fertility, attraction, and relationships. These themes serve both to express and to reinforce the values of the community regarding the continuation of the species. Such expressions can be found in the form of fertility rites, courtship dances, romantic songs, and the celebration of milestones such as marriage and childbirth.

However, as you've alluded to with your use of the term "queer" and your personal journey, there's also a recognition that human experience and identity are diverse and not solely confined to reproductive roles. The "pollen and seed" metaphor captures the essence of this biological drive, but humans also cultivate lives rich in emotional, intellectual, and spiritual dimensions that transcend this drive.

This broader view acknowledges that the worth of individuals and their contributions to society extends beyond their role in species health propagation. It embraces the full spectrum of human expression and identity, including those that do not fit into traditional reproductive narratives.

In contemporary times, there is a growing acceptance and understanding of the many ways people express their identities and lead their lives, which includes but is not limited to their reproductive roles. This shift allows for a more inclusive view of human value and the recognition that the "song/dance" of humanity is indeed varied and complex, filled with myriad expressions of beingness and creativity.

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